Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd World Congress on Nano Science and Nano Technology Osaka,Japan.

Day 2 :

Asia Pacific Nano Congress 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Yung Joon Jung photo
Biography:

Dr. Yung Joon Jung is Professor at Northeastern University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and co-faculty director at Kostas Advanced Nano Characterization Center at Kostas Research Institute, Northeastern University. He received Ph.D. in Materials Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 2003. He worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Rensselaer, and joined Northeastern University at 2005. Prof. Jung’s research focuses on investigating new synthetic routes for low dimensional nanomaterials and engineering their molecular structures. He also develops nanomanufacturing processes such as assembly and integration of nanomaterials and nanostructured architectures for nanoelectronics, flexible devices, various sensors and energy storage applications supported by National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, US Army, Ministry of Industry in Republic of Korea and other industries. He published over 65 articles in journals and three book chapters. He is also a co-founder of Guradion Technologies that develop networkable high performance ion and radiation sensors.

Abstract:

Over the past two decades, researches on low-dimensional carbon nanostructured materials (SWCNT and graphene) designed for a variety of sensor applications have made remarkable progress. However scalable fabrication and engineering of high performance sensors that harness 2-3 dimensional nano/micro architectures of these nanomaterials have remained largely elusive. Such methodologies will allow unprecedented device architectures fully utilizing superior physical and chemical properties of these nanomaterials for high performance and low SWaP sensors. Here we present some of our progresses in assembly and engineering of singlewalled nanotube networks and building 2-3D architectures for broad ranges of high performance chemical, optical and ion sensors by combining state-of-the-art assembly and transfer based nanomanufacturing strategies developed in our laboratory.

 

 

Asia Pacific Nano Congress 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Jean-Luc Pelouard photo
Biography:

Jean-Luc Pelouard has completed his PhD from Paris-Sud University at Orsay France, and postdoctoral studies from NCSU at Raleigh, NC USA. Since 2000 he is “Directeur de Recherche” at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). He is currently co-managing the Common Research Laboratory MiNaO between CNRS and ONERA that is devoted to both fundamental and applied studies on infrared properties of sub-wavelength nanostructures (more details on minao.fr). He has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals. He holds 15 international patents and has supervised 22 PhD theses

 

 

Abstract:

The extreme light confinement provided by sub-wavelength metal-dielectric structures pushes towards revisiting the design rules of the photo-detectors. Furthermore, introducing absorbing layers in optical nano-resonators demands a dedicated electromagnetic design. Developing together semiconducting heterostructures and optical nano-antennas opens the way for performance improvements and new functionalities, introducing very promising features such as ultra-thin absorbing layers and device area much smaller than its optical cross-section. High responsivity, high-speed behavior, and carved optical response are among the expected properties of this new generation of photo-detectors.
 
In this talk, I present a GMR InGaAs photo-detector dedicated for imaging applications (FPA) as an illustration of this global design. I discuss the cross-linked properties of the optical and semiconductor structures. Experimental results show at λ = 1.55 μm an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 75% and a specific detectivity of 1013 cm.√Hz.W-1.

Keynote Forum

Dr. Masumi Saka

Tohoku University, Japan

Keynote: Green fabrication of micro/nano materials by migration phenomena

Time : 11:15-12:00

Asia Pacific Nano Congress 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Masumi Saka  photo
Biography:

Masumi Saka has received his Bachelor of Engineering degree in 1977 and his Doctor of Engineering degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1982, both from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. He became a Professor at Tohoku University in 1993. His research interests lie in the evaluation of materials system and the fabrication of metallic micro- and nano-materials. He is an Editor of a book entitled “Metallic Micro and Nano Materials”.

 

 

Abstract:

Migration phenomena of atoms and ions have been known as negative factors, resulting in the deterioration in the electronic devices through the formation of voids, hillocks, whiskers and dendrites. For instance, the electromigration (EM), stress-induced migration (SM) and Electrochemical Migration (ECM) are owing to driving forces of electron flow, mechanical stress gradient and electric field, respectively. EM forms voids and hillocks at the ends of cathode and anode in interconnect. SM generates hillocks and whiskers in the thin films and interconnects. ECM precipitates the dendrites with fractal shape in water and on the surface of electrode. These migrations have often been studied on Al, Sn and Cu elements which are widely used as interconnects in devices and several countermeasures were proposed to improve the reliability of devices. Recently, the fabrication techniques of micro/nano materials have been developed by applying the scientific knowledge obtained from the prevention researches. Micro/nano materials with shapes of wire, rod, tube and needle are promising materials for enhancing the device performance. The trial fabrication and synthesis techniques have been demonstrated to grow upcoming materials. In particular, our group has developed the fabrication techniques of micro/nano materials by using EM, SM and ECM. In this presentation, our trials of the fabrication techniques are reviewed for getting an insight into advanced fabrication and application of the materials.

 

  • Video Presentation
Location: Osaka, Japan

Session Introduction

Dr. Shengyong Xu

Peking University, China

Title: Impacts of nanoscale events on the neural functions of lives

Time : 12:00-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Shengyong Xu received B. Sc. in Physics from the Peking University in 1988, and Ph.D. degree from Department of Physics, National University of Singapore in 1999. He is currently a professor with Department of Electronics, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Sciences, Peking University. He has published more than 200 journal and conference papers. His group currently works on the physics mechanism of electrical communication among neuron cells and normal cells, brain modeling, memory mechanism of a brain, temperature sensing at the cell and sub-cell levels, etc.

 

Abstract:

In this talk, we will show that synapse may play a crucial role in memory function and brain working mechanism [1,2]. We presented a model, stating that data for memory are stored and retrieved in the form of a strongly connected network of neurosomes, patterns of which form topological “2D codes” in layered neurons in a brain. In different reaction modes, a chemical synapse or a mixed synapse could turn into an electrical synapse. These transitions, together with an echoing process between two neighboring layers of neurosomes could establish temporary memory and long-term memory information in the forms of neurosome-based 2D codes. The size of a synapse is only around one micrometer, and the gap between two connecting synapses is of nanometer scale. Why some connections could last for 10-50 years, while some others only last for seconds? Are there reverse processes so that strongly connected synapses could depart, thus leading to fresh functions of a brain? These are interesting open questions.
 
We will also show that a transient ion current passing through a protein channel embedded in a membrane creates a pulsed, soliton-like electromagnetic (EM) wave. This kind of EM pulses propagate well in the networks of dielectric phosphorous lipid bilayers. In an electrolyte-membrane-electrolyte structure defined as soft-material waveguide, an EM wave may transmit with a higher efficiency than in cytoplasm [3,4]. Such a scenario explains better some unique phenomena observed in the nature, such as the “simultaneous phenomenon” observed in prey behavior of flytraps and discharge of electric ells, where a big amount of reactors in a biosystem almost simultaneously respond to a single input signal and complete reactions within milliseconds .
 
We will discuss the impacts of nanoscale events on the neural functions of lives.
 

  • Materials science and Nanotechnology| Advance Nanomaterials and Nanoparticles | Applications of Nanotechnology | Nanotechnology in Waste water treatment | Nanotechnology in Agriculture and Food Industry | Regenerative Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery
Location: Osaka, Japan
Speaker

Chair

Prof. Jae-Jin Shim

Yeungnam University, South Korea

Speaker

Co-Chair

Jean-Luc Pelouard

University of Paris-Saclay, France

Speaker
Biography:

Yubiao Niu is Research Officer in Nanomaterials Lab of Swansea University. His research interest focuses on the development of innovative nanomaterials from earth-abundant materials for heterogeneous catalysis to alleviate the problems with the availability of precious metals as catalyst, including the fabrication of nanomaterials, the fundamental studies of nanostructures and the catalytic measurements. He has the expertise in nanocluster fabrication with cluster beam source and (aberration-corrected) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) together with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

 

Abstract:

The discovery of highly active and low-cost electrochemical catalysts is a crucial challenge for the development of efficient hydrogen technologies. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an earth-abundant material and considered a promising candidate for electrocatalytic applications such as the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). DFT calculations have demonstrated that transition metal (Fe, Co, Ni) doping of MoS2 should increase the activity in the HER. Here we report a novel one-step strategy for the preparation of Ni-doped transition metal-MoS2-x hybrid clusters, based on dual-target magnetron sputtering and gas condensation. The structure and composition of the clusters are analyzed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) mode coupled with EDX. From the electrochemical measurements, the Ni-MoS2-x nanoclusters display a favourable 100 mV shift in the HER onset potential and an almost 3-fold increase in exchange current density compared with undoped MoS2 clusters. It is believed that sulfur atoms at the edge sites of the MoS2 layers make the main contribution to the HER catalytic activity. Thus we have also explored sulfur-enrichment of (mass-selected) MoS2-x clusters, via sulfur evaporation and cluster annealing under vacuum conditions. Sulfur addition leads to MoS2+x clusters with well-developed crystalline structure instead of poorly ordered layer structures, and significantly enhances the activity in the HER, with 200 mV shifts to lower HER onset potentials and more than a 30-fold increase in exchange current density.

 

Dr. Awais Ali

Yeungnam University, Republic of Korea

Title: ZnMoS4 nanorods grown on Ni foam for high performance hybrid-supercapacitors

Time : 14:00-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Awais Ali is a Ph.D. Student in the School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Republic of Korea. His research focuses on energy storage devices, especially supercapacitors. His work is on improving the energy storage capacity using different metal sulfides. He focuses on making materials that can store more energy and can show long cycling stability (charge-discharge).

Abstract:

Supercapacitors, also known as electrochemical capacitors, are a new type of energy storage device which bridges the gap between rechargeable batteries and conventional dielectric capacitors. Batteries and supercapacitors are currently the primary choices offering reliable and convenient accessible energy storage. As for energy storage devices, electrochemical supercapacitors provide a higher power density and modest energy density as compared with batteries. Recently, carbon-based nanomaterials, such as activated carbon, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene have been studied for supercapacitor electrodes. Among them, activated carbon is still attractive because of its low cost and well-established electrochemical properties. Metal oxides, and their composites have become attractive in various applications for new generation nano-electronic devices including supercapacitors and lithium-ion batteries. Among these, metal sulfides are also known to be electrochemically active materials for supercapacitor applications. ZnMoS4 nanorods were successfully synthesized on 3D- Ni-foam (NF) by one step hydrothermal process. The ZnMoS4 nanorods grown on NF delivers good specific capacitance. The hybrid supercapacitor with splendid electrochemical performance is rationally demonstrated by employing ZnMoS4 and activated carbon as the positive and negative electrode respectively. Hybrid supercapacitor shows good energy density, power density and excellent cycling stability.  These results suggest that the binder free ZnMoS4 nanorods is a suitable battery type positive electrode for high-performance hybrid supercapacitors.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ganesh Dhakal is a Ph.D. student in the School of Chemical engineering, Yeungnam University, Republic of Korea. He is primarily concerned in energy storage devices such as supercapacitors. His research work focuses on enhancing the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitors using different electrolytes.

 

Abstract:

With the development of the science and technology, people in era are more fascinated to use the portable, highly efficient, and safe electronic device. To fulfill all this demand of the growing population in a single device is a challenging issue and is limited by the energy storage device. Among the energy storage device, supercapacitor are emerging energy storage device due to their distinctive features of rapid charging and discharging process, long cycle life, high specific power, low maintenance  and environmental friendly. So to address this issue, Co3O4@ nickel foam carrying plate-like (Co3O4-P) and grass-like (Co3O4-G) morphologies were prepared as the binder-free supercapacitor electrode materials by varying temperature. The physicochemical properties of as-prepared electrodes are characterized using scanning electron microscopy, High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For the first time, we tested the electrochemical performance of the electrodes using redox additive electrolyte (RAE). The homogeneously grown grass like microstructure (Co3O4-G) favors the superior electrochemical performance as compared to those plates like structure (Co3O4-P) in   KOH. Furthermore, we have improved the electrochemical performance of the Co3O4-G by using a redox-additive electrolyte in KOH solution. Remarkably, just by varying the concentration of the RAE in KOH, the specific capacitance of Co3O4-G increased by 4-fold. Irrespective of the various morphology of the electrode materials under investigation, the concentration of RAE plays a vital role in influencing the electrochemical performance of the system.

 

Chun-Chi Chung

National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan

Title: Preliminary discussion and verification for far infrared radiation energy

Time : 15:00-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Chun-Chi Chung is graduate students in Dept. of Industrial Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan from 2017. His major research fields are in nano-materials, HVAC&R engineering and energy-saving technique.

 

Abstract:

Far-infrared radiation energy can enhance the disturbance of fluid molecules and their collision with surrounding objects, thereby promoting energy transfer. However, the far-infrared radiation energy of such materials still requires verification. In this study, 2.5 wt.% far-infrared radiation materials (FIRMs; namely Al2O3, ZnO, ZrO2 and SiO2), artificial far-infrared ceramics, TiO2, graphite and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were added to acrylic paints to form Far-Infrared Coatings (FIRCs). These FIRCs were coated on stainless steel plates and mounted in PMMA cuvettes. Each cuvette was then filled with 2 mL of 0.2 wt.% Al2O3/water nano-fluid (AWNF) as a spectrometer sample and the absorbance of the samples was measured initially and after 24 hours at different ambient temperatures (30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C). The far-infrared radiation energy intensity of each sample was evaluated based on the difference in AWNF absorbance before and after standing for 24 hours. The results showed that FIRCs with different FIRMs could improve AWNF suspension performance at different ambient temperatures in most cases. Among these FIRMs, ZnO had the strongest effect on improved AWNF suspension performance. However, FIRCs with different FIRMs still varied considerably at different ambient temperatures in terms of improved AWNF suspension performance. This phenomenon indicates that ambient temperature also affects the far-infrared radiation energy intensity of FIRMs.

 

  • Poster Presentation
Location: Osaka, Japan

Session Introduction

Yu-Tsen Liu

National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan

Title: Analysis of MRSA combining aptamer-modified magnetic nanoparticles and mass spectrometry

Time : 15:30-16:00

Biography:

Yu-Tsen Liu is currently pursuing Masters in Chemistry from National Dong Hwa University.

 

Abstract:

In recent years, the abuse of antibiotics has led to bacterial variation in drug resistance, which has become a major risk for public health safety. The present work applied magnetics nanoparticles modified with highly specific aptamers to the capture of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The affinity probe is easy to synthesize and reusable. After silica and polyacrylic acid was modified on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles, and the highly specific DNA of MRSA was covalently bound to the particles. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can be quickly captured by the probes. The probe is superior to antibody probes in stability and cost. The 60 minute capture time for MRSA has a capture rate of more than 90% while the capture rate for the antibiotic-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus is less than 15%. The bacteria species were further identified by mass spectrometer. The proposed method can be applied to quickly screen clinical samples and reduce the analysis time compared to the conventional methods.